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Princeton Energy Case Competition

For High school students

Finding solutions to today's energy problems

SCROLL DOWN FOR OFFICIAL RULES FOR PECC2017.

Saturday December 9, 2017
Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment
Princeton University

Submit e-mail to receive updates about PECC.
Email puea@princeton.edu with any questions.

 
 
 
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About

 
 

Calling all high school students...

"As the world's need for energy grows and the burning of fossil fuels warms Earth to dangerous levels, the quest to find sustainable, practical solutions to these issues becomes one of the most important tasks that we must undertake today... Saving our environment will not hinge on a singular grand solution, but a constellation of technologies and policies working together."
-Lynn Loo, Director of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment

The Princeton Energy Case Competition offers the chance for high school students to explore a multifaceted solution to a pressing energy problem today. Participants will compete in teams of 1-3 and create a 5 presentation on a solution in one of three categories. The presentation can include visual aids (slide-show, videos, models, etc) or anything else the team sees fit.

Competitors will have their presentations judged by Princeton faculty members in various energy fields and participate in panel discussions with Princeton professors and students. All participants will also get the chance to tour the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratories, Princeton energy facilities such as the solar field and the co-generation natural gas plant, and sustainable research projects from Princeton lab groups such as the rammed earth spiral and the thermoheliodome.

We want to emphasize that this competition is for students interested in all disciplines - science and technology and social sciences and humanities. The world's energy and climate problems can only be solved with combinations of technology and policy, science and psychology, and industry and academia, and the goal of this competition is to reflect how real world solutions are approached.

 

JUDGing Panel (2016)

THOMAS KREUTZ
Energy Systems Analysis Group
Andlinger Center for Energy
and the Environment

***KEYNOTE SPEAKER***

CLAIRE WHITE
Professor
of Civil and Environmental Engineering
and the Andlinger Center for Energy
and the Environment

HANS MEERMAN
Energy Systems Analysis Group
Andlinger Center for Energy
and the Environment

 

 

 

 

 

 

JUDGing Panel 2017

Yana LANTSBERG

Yana Lantsberg is an associate at Paul Hastings.  Her experience encompasses a wide range of sectors, including power, oil and gas, mining, infrastructure, and renewables.

Stan D. Trybulski

Stan D. Trybulski is the Director of Energy Strategy at the New York State Energy Research & Development Authority.

Paul McMenemy

Paul Mcmenemy co-founded Harvest Power, Inc. which is an organics management company  that specializes in converting food waste and yard waste into biofuel, compost, mulch and fertilizer.

Ginevra Guzzi

Ginevra Guzzi  is an analyst in the Energy Practice at Charles River Associates.

Minjie Chen

Minjie Chen is an assistant professor of Electrical Engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment at Princeton University. He leads the Princeton Power Electronics Research Lab (PERL).

egemen kolemen

Egemen Koleman in as assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Princeton University, jointly appoointed with the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment and the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL).

 

Competition Information (2017)

DATE OF COMPETITION: Saturday, December 9th, 2017

Competitors’ main objective will be to design a climate change solution that aims to either mitigate humans’ environmental impact, or prevent the consequences associated with climate change. Teams can have anywhere from one to three members.

Solutions aimed towards mitigating environmental impact can focus on increasing the efficiency of current technologies, adjusting government policy plans, making solutions more economically viable, and more. Renewable energy categories can include solar energy, wind energy, geothermal energy, thermoelectric energy, hydrogen energy, hydroelectric energy, bioenergy, and any other plan used to reduce the usage of coal, oil, gas, and other fossil fuels.

Submissions aimed towards prevention can be about preventing the effects associated with climate change, including seawalls, ozone regeneration, etc. Any of the renewable energy categories listed above can also be used, if they are applicable.

TIMELINE:

  • Register online by Sunday, November 26th, 2017.
  • Submit Summaries by Friday December 8th at 5PM EST.
  • Submit presentations by Saturday, December 9th, 2017.

 

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First Round, part 1: Written Summaries

Summaries of background information about whichever renewable energy solution the competitors choose will be due on December 8th at 5:00 pm EST, the day before the Energy Case Competition.

Format

  • For organization, use subheadings. Any graphics should have captions and appropriate citations.
  • All information obtained from outside sources must be properly referenced.

Content

  • These summaries will include: basic information on the technology; how it is currently used; current problems with its implementation; an evaluation of current solutions and their potential; and a bibliography. Summaries can be a maximum of three pages, not including the bibliography.

Scoring:

  • The summaries will be judged on feasibility; innovative thought; and complexity in considering problems and solutions. The judges will also consider organization, pertinence to the topic, and effectiveness in their scoring. A precise rubric will be released in November.
  • Scores earned on the summary will be 40% of the competitors’ first-round scores.

Tips

  • Since competitors will only have five minutes for presentations, we recommend they include long explanations of technical information in the written summary rather than in the presentation.
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First Round, part 2: Presentations

On December 9th, the day of the competition, competitors will present a proposal for the solution they designed.

Format

  • Presentations may be a maximum of five minutes long.
  • Competitors are allowed to use an accompanying slideshow.

Content

  • Presentations should address: the importance of the renewable energy solution they are discussing; current problems in the implementation of the specified solution; and a plan for addressing these issues.

Scoring

  • Competitors will be judged on innovative thought; their ability to effectively explain any technical information; complexity in their understanding of and approach to the problems described; and the feasibility of the proposed solution. Communication skills and professionalism will also be considered. A precise rubric will be released in November.
  • This presentation will constitute 60% of first-round scores.

Tips

  • Since judges will have read the submitted summaries, competitors should only briefly address background information. They should focus most of their presentations on their proposed solution and the issues it aims to solve.

Other Details

  • Spectators will not be allowed for this round.
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Final Round: Presentation + Question-Answer Session

The six teams with the highest first-round scores (summary + presentation) will progress to a final round. During this round, they will give their presentation again, then take five minutes to answer questions from the judges.

Format

  • Competitors will have five minutes to present and five minutes to answer questions.

Content

  • Answers should show that competitors have thorough knowledge of their chosen topic and have considered their solution from many angles.

Scoring

  • The first-round summary (40% of the first-round score) and presentation (60% of the first-round score) scores will be used to determine who will progress to the final round.
  • Final winners will be determined using the combined summary + presentation score (which will constitute 30% of the final score) and the final round score (70% of the final score).
  • In the final round, students will be judged on professionalism, content knowledge, consideration of issues from multiple perspectives, and use of multiple points of view to suggest a comprehensive solution. A precise rubric will be released in September.

Tips

  • Before the final round, competitors will be given their rubrics from the first presentations. We recommend that they take into account any feedback from judges for their final round.

Other Details

  • Spectators will be allowed in this round.

Example topics and resources:

 

Rubrics for first and final rounds:

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SPONSORS

 
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PECC 2016

THANK YOU TO ALL PARTICIPANTS, Judges, and Volunteers!!!

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS + EVENT DESCRIPTIONS
PRESENTATION TIMES + JUDGING PANEL BIOS
SAMPLE SCORE SHEET

 

Congratulations to our winners!

  1st Place Overall/1st Place Free Choice:    YIHAN (WENDY) WU   High Technology High School    Yihan Wu swept the competition with her innovative solution of applying thermoelectric materials to asphalt roadways as a source of renewable energy.  Check out her winning presentation here!

1st Place Overall/1st Place Free Choice:

YIHAN (WENDY) WU
High Technology High School

Yihan Wu swept the competition with her innovative solution of applying thermoelectric materials to asphalt roadways as a source of renewable energy. Check out her winning presentation here!

  2nd Place overall/2nd Place Free Choice:    INDIRA ROY   Chatham High School    Indira Roy impressed the judges with her energy solution of algal biofuel.  Check out her winning presentation here!

2nd Place overall/2nd Place Free Choice:

INDIRA ROY
Chatham High School

Indira Roy impressed the judges with her energy solution of algal biofuel. Check out her winning presentation here!

   3rd Place Overall/1st Place Renewable Roadblocks     KELLY YU & GRACE WU   John P. Stevens High School    "The Energizers" did a great job exploring the potential of ocean energy from technological, social, and economic perspectives,  Check out their winning presentation here!

3rd Place Overall/1st Place Renewable Roadblocks

KELLY YU & GRACE WU
John P. Stevens High School

"The Energizers" did a great job exploring the potential of ocean energy from technological, social, and economic perspectives, Check out their winning presentation here!

 
  2nd Place Renewable Roadblocks    NELSON LIN   High Technology High School   Nelson Lin won 2nd Place in "Renewable Roadblocks" with his presentation on nuclear energy.

2nd Place Renewable Roadblocks

NELSON LIN
High Technology High School

Nelson Lin won 2nd Place in "Renewable Roadblocks" with his presentation on nuclear energy.

  3rd Place Renewable Roadblocks    ZIYU WANG, ALEXANDER BARRETT, ANDY PANG   Moorestown Friends School   The "Curvature-Driven Motion" Team placed with their presentation on hydroelectric power.  Check out their winning presentation here!    

3rd Place Renewable Roadblocks

ZIYU WANG, ALEXANDER BARRETT, ANDY PANG
Moorestown Friends School

The "Curvature-Driven Motion" Team placed with their presentation on hydroelectric power. Check out their winning presentation here!

 

  3rd Place Free Choice    RAHUL KANANI & KUSH PATEL   John P. Stevens High School   "The Bio-Generators" placed with their presentation on co-digestion of sewage and food waste for biogas harvesting. Check out their winning presentation here!

3rd Place Free Choice

RAHUL KANANI & KUSH PATEL
John P. Stevens High School

"The Bio-Generators" placed with their presentation on co-digestion of sewage and food waste for biogas harvesting. Check out their winning presentation here!

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