Competition Information and Rules

Competitors’ main objective will be to design a climate change solution that aims to either mitigate human’s environmental impact or reverse the adverse effects of climate change. Solutions aimed towards mitigating environmental impact can focus on increasing the efficiency of current technologies, adjusting government policy plans, making solutions more economically viable, etc. Renewable energy categories encompass energy sources with short carbon cycles that can reduce, supplement, or replace the usage of coal, oil, natural gas, and other fossil fuels; these include - but not limited to - solar, wind, geothermal, hydrogen, hydroelectric and biomass. Submissions aimed towards prevention can be about preventing the effects associated with climate change, including seawalls, ozone regeneration, seed banks, etc.


IMPORTANT DATES

  • Registration Deadline: Saturday, December 1st, 2018 at 11:59PM EST.

  • Summary and Presentation Submission Deadline: Friday, December 7th, 2018 at 11:59PM EST.

  • Competition Date: Saturday, December 8th, 2018 - Competition Schedule

PRESENTATIONS

Participants can compete individually or in teams up to three people. They will create a 5 minute presentation, which can include visual aids (slide-show, video, models, demonstrations, etc.) or anything else the team sees fit, on a solution in one of three categories.

  1. RENEWABLE ROADBLOCKS

    Why is the world not entirely powered by renewable energy? Competitors are to reconcile the major roadblocks preventing renewable energy from dominating energy markets today. Teams will address a scale (global, national, local, etc.) and audience (NJ government, industry, consumers, NGO, etc.) of their choosing.

    FOCUS on one type of renewable energy and explain why it is promising for a specific climate and energy goal (e.g. cutting emissions to prevent a 1.5 degree warming, successful sustainable development in developing regions, etc).

    DESCRIBE roadblocks from at least three avenues (e.g. scientific, policy, economic, social, etc.).

    OUTLINE a comprehensive and innovative solution that addresses roadblocks.

  2. NJ’s Energy Future

    How should New Jersey evolve it’s energy plan to best serve both environmental goals and the state’s own development goals? Competitors are to demonstrate understand of NJ’s energy systems today and offer an energy plan that is best suited for the state’s interests. (For participants outside of New Jersey, feel free to adapt this topic to your own state under “Free Choice”).

    REVIEW New Jersey’s current energy profile and plan, emphasizing areas unique to the state.

    PINPOINT areas of high potential in at least three avenues (e.g. scientific, policy, economic, social, etc.) for a specific climate energy goal (e.g. cutting emissions to prevent a 1.5 degree warming, successful sustainable development in developing regions, etc).

    OUTLINE a comprehensive and innovative energy plan for NJ that addresses one or more areas of high potential

  3. Free Choice

    What is one topic in energy or energy-related areas that you are especially interested in, and how can it effectively aid in solving the world’s climate and energy problems? Competitors are to identify a pressing topic in climate and energy discussions, explain its importance, and then offer a step-by-step solution.

    EXPLAIN the topic and why it is promising for a specific climate and energy goal (e.g. cutting emissions to prevent a 1.5 degree warming, successful sustainable development in developing regions, etc).

    INVESTIGATE potential roadblocks from at least three avenues (e.g. scientific, policy, economic, social, etc.).

    OUTLINE a comprehensive and innovative solution that utilizes the topic and addresses roadblocks.

2018 JUDGING PANEL

Competitors will have their presentations judged by professionals working various energy fields as well as Princeton faculty members.

Judge List will be announced soon.

Format

First ROUND, PART 1: WRITTEN SUMMARIES

Competitors will submit written summaries of background information about their topic due December 7th, 2018 at 11:59 PM EST.

FIRST ROUND, PART 2: PRESENTATIONS

Competitors will present a proposal for the solution during the morning of the competition day.

FINAL ROUND: PRESENTATION + QUESTION-ANSWER SEssion

The six teams with the highest first-round scores (summary + presentation) will progress to a final round. Final round competitors will give their presentations again, then will answer questions from the judges.

For more detailed information, click here.

For the First Round Rubric click here.


EXAMPLE TOPICS and RESOURCES